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    FAQ

    1Are all our products Vegan?

    Yes! We have no form of any animal substances in our products.

    That includes all forms of animal dairy and animal meat.

    2Is a vegan diet healthy?

    Yes! In fact, according to the The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics have stated that a vegan diet is appropriate for us at any stage of our life including pregnancy, infancy, childhood and for athletes!

    A balanced vegan diet consisting of a wide variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts and seeds is the healthiest of all, with the bonus of higher antioxidants and lower saturated fat and cholesterol. A well planned vegan diet can also help with the prevention and treatment of many illnesses and diseases such as; heart disease, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, kidney stones and some cancers.

    But it is important to note that any diet can be unhealthy. A diet of burgers, fries, soft drinks and ice cream isn’t going to be healthy regardless of whether it’s vegan or not.

    3But where do you get your protein?

    Getting enough protein is not actually as hard as people will make you think. What people don’t realise is that protein is in virtually everything we eat! Plus most adults need only about 50g a day but consume considerably more than this.

    Great vegan sources of protein include, tofu, tempeh, seitan, lentils, chickpeas, beans, nuts and seeds.

    Translated into everyday food this could include:
    Muesli with banana and soymilk
    Peanut butter on wholegrain toast
    Soy shake
    Handful of nuts and seeds
    Wrap with hummus, salad and falafel
    Soy yoghurt or muesli bar
    Veggie stir fry with tofu
    And remember all the biggest and toughest creatures in the animal kingdom are herbivores!

    4Where do I get iron from?

    From plants! Try to ensure that you eat a variety of foods, such as dark green leafy vegetables, beans and lentils, seeds, wholegrains, nuts and dried fruit. Foods such as breakfast cereals and orange juice are often fortified with iron.

    Vitamin C aids the absorption of iron in the body so a vegan diet is at an advantage as it generally contains a variety of fruit and vegetables. If you are concerned about your iron intake then try to avoid drinking tea or red wine with your food. The tannins contained in them can inhibit the absorption of iron.

    5I’ve heard that vegans have trouble getting enough B12?

    Vegans can get B12 through fortified soy milk, marmite and savoury yeast flakes. B12 has also been added to some other vegan products (eg. some Sanitarium burgers, sausages and ice ‘creams’ – check labels though as some Sanitarium products contain eggs and dairy).

    We recommend that vegans take a B12 supplement as any B12 present in plant foods is not easily absorbed into the body.

    It is important to also realise B12 is usually supplemented into ‘livestock’ animals diets too, so there is no ‘natural’ way for getting B12 in today’s society.

    6What is wrong with eating dairy products?

    Many people do not realise the cruelty involved in the dairy industry. A cow, like a human, only produces milk when she has a baby to feed. Dairy cows are therefore forced to produce calf after calf, each of whom are taken from her shortly after birth, in order to keep her producing milk. The stress placed on the cow often results in her being killed as young as 7 years old (in Australia), when her natural lifespan is between 20-25 years.

    The female calves of these cows often replace other members of the dairy herd, whereas the male calves are an unwanted product of the industry. They are either raised for veal or killed shortly after birth.

    Not only is dairy unethical, it is also unhealthy as it is high in saturated fat and cholesterol and is linked to obesity, heart disease, cancer, diabetes and osteoporosis. Dairy can also cause Iron deficiency anaemia in infants and toddlers. For further information on the dairy industry go to cowtruth.com